Persimmon

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arnorrian
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Persimmon

#1

Post: # 34016Unread post arnorrian
Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:25 am

After six years my persimmon finally fruited. I picked one fruit that was a bit soft and dark orange (it had a bit of rot), and it was mildly astringent and mildly sweet. I have no idea which variety the tree is. Anybody has experience with persimmons? Should I wait for the frost to pick them?

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Rajun Gardener
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Re: Persimmon

#2

Post: # 34018Unread post Rajun Gardener
Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:19 am

Let them fully ripen to the point they will burst open if you squeeze them. I usually pick them when they're soft and let them ripen more on the counter for about a week.
Zone: 9A
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Shule
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Re: Persimmon

#3

Post: # 34113Unread post Shule
Tue Nov 17, 2020 4:30 am

Those are huge! I only have experience eating them (just a little). I've had a small kind from a tree in Indiana and a large kind from a grocery store. Both were good, in different ways.
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Re: Persimmon

#4

Post: # 34119Unread post karstopography
Tue Nov 17, 2020 8:05 am

https://greenblender.com/smoothies/7202 ... persimmons

The photo looks like the hachiya type, which are astringent until fully ripe. Freezing the ripe fruit may remove the astringent nature.
Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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Re: Persimmon

#5

Post: # 34120Unread post zendog
Tue Nov 17, 2020 8:10 am

Frost will help take out the astringency so as long as it isn't getting into the low 20s you should be okay.
As suggested above, some people actually freeze their nearly ripe persimmons to take out the astringency.

In my area, squirrels will start stealing them as soon as the astringency drops, so we need to pick them before they get fully ripe and just let them ripen inside. As long as they are fully yellow/orange they ripen inside just fine.

Another way to remove astringency if you want to try it is by putting some persimmons in a sealed container or zip lock bag with a small dish of a teaspoon or 2 of high proof Alchohol like vodka. Leave them for 3 or 4 days and the Alchohol will infuse the air inside and take the astringency out of the persimmons. This is good if you don't like the really soft flesh of fully ripe astringent persimmons, since you can do this and eat them a little firmer. Sometimes they may have a bit of an alchohol taste, but I like that actually. If you don't like that flavor, it usually disappears after a day when you take them out of the bag/container and they are back in fresh air.

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arnorrian
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Re: Persimmon

#6

Post: # 34127Unread post arnorrian
Tue Nov 17, 2020 11:21 am

Light frost is forecasted for the weekend, I'll pick them after it. Neighbors are asking me all the time what these are, especially now that the leaves are falling off. I tried both astringent and non-astringent "ready to eat" persimmons, the astringent ones both unripe and ripe. This one is very mildly astringent, and the flesh is still firm. The tree tried to fruit the last two years, but it was attacked by some leaf disease and shed all the fruits. I spayed this year with an fungicide for anthracnosis of apple and it helped a lot.
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Climate: Cfa
USDA hardiness zone: 7a
Elevation: 140 m

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Re: Persimmon

#7

Post: # 34278Unread post NarnianGarden
Thu Nov 19, 2020 7:32 pm

In my country, we get persimmons from Spain and Israel, mainly. Some brave people have grown them in a greenhouse, or as an indoor plant - but it doesn't survive outside without assistance... not in our normal winter.

Would love to try this fruits straight from a tree, but so far, I have to do with a supermarket one..
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arnorrian
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Re: Persimmon

#8

Post: # 34314Unread post arnorrian
Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:40 am

I tried one that got very soft and deep dark orange. The sweetest fruit I ever tried. It's like jam. The astringency is gone completely. I cut the top off and ate it with a spoon.
Climate: Cfa
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Re: Persimmon

#9

Post: # 34327Unread post NarnianGarden
Fri Nov 20, 2020 2:28 pm

arnorrian wrote:
Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:40 am
I tried one that got very soft and deep dark orange. The sweetest fruit I ever tried. It's like jam. The astringency is gone completely. I cut the top off and ate it with a spoon.
Yes, it does get very sugary... There is a variety which cannot be eaten while hard - it will turn you into a sourpuss immediately :D (called 'kaki plum')
The ones we get these days in the supermarket, are OK to eat while still hard.
I like mine not too soft, not too hard, but medium :)
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karstopography
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Re: Persimmon

#10

Post: # 34358Unread post karstopography
Sat Nov 21, 2020 2:22 am

Diospyros virginiana, the native to the eastern part of North America persimmons, are very sweet and delicious when ripe. I’ve got a couple of young trees growing and hope to have my own little supply one of these years.

Diospyros texana Is another persimmon that grows wild here in parts of Texas and is reportedly very tasty, I just am never in the right place at the right time to harvest any.

I’m making it a point to enjoy more of the wild edibles available. Persimmons are interesting fruit, wild or cultivated.
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Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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arnorrian
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Re: Persimmon

#11

Post: # 34361Unread post arnorrian
Sat Nov 21, 2020 6:01 am

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Climate: Cfa
USDA hardiness zone: 7a
Elevation: 140 m

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worth1
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Re: Persimmon

#12

Post: # 34436Unread post worth1
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:56 am

We just called the large ones back in the 70's Japanese persimmons.
Some years ago I would drive by a church everyday that had several of the trees.
They would be loaded with them.
Never stopped to pick anything because I didn't want to be accused of stealing.
But right after a good cold snap they would all be gone.
I don't think the church folks did it unless they came out at night to do it.
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