Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

User avatar
SQWIB
Reactions: 137
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 6:41 am
Location: Zone 7A Philly
Contact:

Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#1

Post: # 14872Unread post SQWIB
Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:34 pm

SauerKraut
I used Store bought cabbage


March 7th, 2020


Well, it has been a long time since I made some Fermented Sauerkraut.


3 tablespoons of salt per 5 pounds of shredded cabbage
I tried using a food processor with no luck, I ended up using my Boerner V-Slicer.

Image



Working in 5 pound increments I would add 1/3rd of each bowl, sprinkle a little salt and continue until all 5 pounds were added then I would start shredding my next 5 pounds. This way, the salt had some time to draw out the moisture and also it was an easy way to gauge the salt-to-cabbage ratio.

Image



In between each 5 pounds being added, I would knead the cabbage a bit.

Image

Image

Image

Image




March 10th, 2020

Image

Image




March 21st, 2020

No funky growth at all, I'm a happy camper

Image



I refrigerated a 25 oz jar raw for hot dog toppings. A quick taste test and I was extremely satisfied.

Image



The rest was canned for storage. I had to make a salt brine to top the jars before canning. 1 quart of water to 2 tablespoons salt.

Image



I got a little more than 8.5 quarts out of the shredded 18 pounds of cabbage (5 heads)

Image



Procedure
  • Work with about 5 pounds of cabbage at a time. Discard outer leaves. Rinse heads under cold running water and drain. Cut heads in quarters and remove cores. Shred or slice to a thickness of a quarter.
  • Put cabbage in a suitable fermentation container and add 3 tablespoons of salt. Mix thoroughly, using clean hands.
  • Pack firmly until salt draws juices from cabbage.
  • Repeat shredding, salting, and packing until all cabbage is in the container. Be sure it is deep enough so that its rim is at least 4 or 5 inches above the cabbage. If juice does not cover cabbage, add boiled and cooled brine (1½ tablespoons of salt per quart of water).
  • Add plate and weights, cover container with a clean bath towel.
  • Store at 65° to 75° F while fermenting. At temperatures between 70° and 75° F, kraut will be fully fermented in about is little as 1 week but can go on to 3 to 4 weeks; at 60° to 65° F, fermentation may take 5 to 6 weeks. At temperatures lower than 60° F, kraut may not ferment. Above 75° F, kraut may become soft. If you weigh the cabbage down with a brine-filled bag, do not disturb the crock until normal fermentation is completed (when bubbling ceases). If you use jars as weights, you will have to check the kraut 2 to 3 times each week and remove scum if it forms.
Fully fermented kraut may be kept tightly covered in the refrigerator for several months or it may be canned as follows:
  • Hot pack: Bring kraut and liquid slowly to a boil in a large kettle, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and fill jars rather firmly with kraut and juices, leaving a ½-inch headspace.
  • Raw pack: Fill jars firmly with kraut and cover with juices, leaving a ½-inch headspace.
I sanitized my jars due to water bath canning requirements and raw pack canned this batch.


Boiling water process times
Hot Pack
  • Pint: 10 minutes
  • Quarts: 15 minutes
Raw Pack
  • Pints: 20 minutes
  • Quarts: 25 minutes

User avatar
Nan6b
Reactions: 554
Posts: 992
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:58 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#2

Post: # 14877Unread post Nan6b
Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:51 pm

My DH makes sauerkraut like that. He puts in caraway seeds- I love them! Homemade kraut is so crispy, and you can still taste the cabbage, which is great!

User avatar
Growing Coastal
Reactions: 344
Posts: 385
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:49 pm
Location: Vancouver Island Canada
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#3

Post: # 14940Unread post Growing Coastal
Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:37 am

Great explanation, Sqwib.
No pounding of the cabbage?

I like added caraway too. That's how mom used to make it. Mom would cook up a batch of saur kraut with some fried onions, oil and a bit of sliced carrot. She said that cooking it this way made it sweeter, or less tart and would serve it as a veg.
Another thing she did with the ready kraut was to make soup with some and some kind of fatty meat. A winter dish.
0

User avatar
worth1
Reactions: 1073
Posts: 1774
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 12:32 pm
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#4

Post: # 14942Unread post worth1
Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:42 am

Apples go really well in sauerkraut.
0
Worth
Paul Prudhomme Is The Head Chef In Heaven

User avatar
SQWIB
Reactions: 137
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 6:41 am
Location: Zone 7A Philly
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#5

Post: # 14943Unread post SQWIB
Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:47 am

Growing Coastal wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:37 am
Great explanation, Sqwib.
No pounding of the cabbage?
In between each 5 pounds being added, I would knead the cabbage a bit (sort of like wringing out a wet dish rag) until it became watery and then punch down with my fist, then start my next layer.
0

User avatar
SQWIB
Reactions: 137
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 6:41 am
Location: Zone 7A Philly
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#6

Post: # 14944Unread post SQWIB
Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:48 am

worth1 wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:42 am
Apples go really well in sauerkraut.
Also helps with the ferment.
0

User avatar
dorota
Reactions: 11
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2020 10:43 am
Location: Poland
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#7

Post: # 14971Unread post dorota
Wed Mar 25, 2020 4:23 pm

Cabbage can also be fermented with shredded or sliced carrot. :)
0

User avatar
Nan6b
Reactions: 554
Posts: 992
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:58 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#8

Post: # 14982Unread post Nan6b
Wed Mar 25, 2020 6:43 pm

Coastal, was the cooking before or after the fermenting?
0

User avatar
Shule
Reactions: 214
Posts: 643
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#9

Post: # 14994Unread post Shule
Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:39 pm

@dorota

You know, sunroots have a similar texture as carrots (well, the fried ones have the texture of raw carrots; never tried sunroots raw; baked ones get soft like potatoes). I wonder if shredding them up for something like this would work for the same purpose, and add inulin to help the bacteria grow and ferment the cabbage.
0
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

User avatar
Growing Coastal
Reactions: 344
Posts: 385
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:49 pm
Location: Vancouver Island Canada
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#10

Post: # 14997Unread post Growing Coastal
Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:57 pm

Nan6b wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 6:43 pm
Coastal, was the cooking before or after the fermenting?
After.
I have remembered that the carrot that gets cooked with the sauer kraut is grated (not slivers). That changes the colour and the carrot more or less diappears apart from a few slices.
0

User avatar
dorota
Reactions: 11
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2020 10:43 am
Location: Poland
Contact:

Re: Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut

#11

Post: # 15012Unread post dorota
Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:56 am

Shule
I love baked sunroots, but I've never tried to ferment it. Maybe it is time to try? :)
0

Post Reply

Return to “Fermenting Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest