Amish Paste tomato

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Shule
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Amish Paste tomato

#1

Post: # 30649Unread post Shule
Tue Sep 15, 2020 5:55 pm

I've seen a whole lot of discussion about the Amish Paste tomato for the last few years, but not much this year. Is anyone growing it?

I'm wondering how soft it is. Are the fruits durable, or do they break easily? Do the fruits have good shelf-life and hang-time?

Examples of soft paste tomatoes might include Polish Linguisa and Sheboygan. Examples of firm ones include Napoli, Sausage, and Pakenham Pear. Roma's kind of in-between, maybe leaning slightly toward firm.
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Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

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karstopography
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Re: Amish Paste tomato

#2

Post: # 30651Unread post karstopography
Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:13 pm

I grew one plant. Long, droopy foliage and very much a vining type. Mine were big, like a couple went 11-12 ounces and the run of the mill were 8-9 ounces. They tended to be more heart shaped and not trending dry at all like a Roma can be. I’d say they are above average on shelf life and not especially firm, on the softer side really. I don’t really understand the how durable are they question.

I liked them, but wouldn’t say they had an outstanding or distinctive flavor or anything, but they weren’t bad or bland either. Red tomato flavor. My mom didn’t like them very much and she tends to not like acidic tomatoes so maybe they might be a little acidic. I don’t remember the flavor, mine were done a couple of months ago.
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Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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Shule
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Re: Amish Paste tomato

#3

Post: # 30655Unread post Shule
Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:39 pm

karstopography wrote:
Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:13 pm
… I don’t really understand the how durable are they question. …
By durable, I mean it can handle being tossed around, handled, knocked against something, having things on top of it, etc. without breaking or noticeably bruising. Some tomatoes if you so much as touch them, it seems, they'll break (rip, puncture, or bruise). If it can fall off a countertop and roll over a bunch of sharp rocks without sustaining any damage, then that's a mark of durability.

Durable isn't the same thing as firm, although firm fruits tend to be more durable on average than soft ones. It doesn't necessarily have to do with the thickness of the skin, either. Thick skin can still be weak, and thin skin can still be strong (even without being tough to chew).

I mean, the opposite of fragile.
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Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

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karstopography
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Re: Amish Paste tomato

#4

Post: # 30657Unread post karstopography
Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:26 pm

Can’t honestly evaluate their durability, I’m afraid.
1
Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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