How they ruined the jalapeno.

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worth1
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How they ruined the jalapeno.

#1

Post: # 124339Unread post worth1
Tue May 28, 2024 9:02 am

This might be interesting.

Why hot jalapeño peppers aren’t as spicy as they used to be. https://slate.com/podcasts/decoder-ring ... =web_share
Worth
25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.

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worth1
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#2

Post: # 124340Unread post worth1
Tue May 28, 2024 9:03 am

No wonder they taste like a Bell Pepper.
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karstopography
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#3

Post: # 124344Unread post karstopography
Tue May 28, 2024 9:33 am

Jalapeño “Megatron” I’m growing this year is big and also very mild, even in a red ripe condition. I have to include a Serrano in salsas and pico de gallo just to get some heat. I’ve got one farmer’s market jalapeño plant, but have yet to eat any of those. Two Jalapeño M plants, but not had any of those either.

I like the flavor of jalapeños, but some spicy punch is needed.
Zone 9b, located in the Columbia bottomlands, annual rainfall 46”

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pepperhead212
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#4

Post: # 124358Unread post pepperhead212
Tue May 28, 2024 10:43 am

They've been breeding the heat out of jalapeños for as long as I can remember, yet they've also been constantly trying to get hotter "superhots". However, there's more of a market for the mild ones. What really got the jalapeños going milder was the popularity of "poppers". With the old jalapeños, that I used to get in the 70s, few diners would be able to pop more than one those. Now, there's really no way of telling how hot a given batch of jalapeños is in a market, without sampling it - it might have some heat, but more than likely, it's one of those milder ones, at least around here.
Woodbury, NJ zone 7a/7b

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JRinPA
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#5

Post: # 124405Unread post JRinPA
Tue May 28, 2024 10:18 pm

It doesn't surprise me that Jalapenos have been tamed. Good chance they are also overwatered, in general, for largest weight per acre.

Jalafuego F1....
as far as I'm concerned, it is HOT.
I have saved seed for 7 or 8 years. I have it marked as F7 seed this year. Whether it is truly an F7...it is 7 generations from the F1, selecting for strong plants and fruit that looks like the original, keeping from a few sources each year and just mixing the seed together when planting. It is still plenty hot for me.

I'm usually sweating after 1 popper, heavily sweating after 3. After 7, I'm done. And thinking about more in 20 minutes, after I cool off and my eyes stop watering, cause they are so awesome.

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bower
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#6

Post: # 124503Unread post bower
Thu May 30, 2024 6:01 am

I bought a basket of large Jalapenos last summer from a farm in Ontario - man they were hot. Hot enough that I ended up freezing most of them instead of using them up fresh... Just a few days ago I chopped up a frozen one and added to the blender marinade for chicken. Afterwards made rice with the drippings - and wow, I was really pleased that even the rice came out quite spicy with the heat and taste from the one large jalapeno (they were about 5 inches long, which is bigger than the ones I've grown before).
I also had baskets of Super Shepherd pepper from the same farm - honestly the best red sweet pepper ever. They obviously choose their varieties carefully... wonder what line of jalapeno that is.
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worth1
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#7

Post: # 124506Unread post worth1
Thu May 30, 2024 6:08 am

I bought some yesterday that were hot.
Not as hot as I've seen them but hot enough.
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JRinPA
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#8

Post: # 125244Unread post JRinPA
Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:33 am

So...cowboy candy.
When I first read about it, I could not imagine why anyone would want to eat that. But...I never ate jalapenos much before growing them myself. We got the Vlasic ones in a huge jar for cheap for quesadillas, that was it. I'd get them on italian hoagies, yeah, not that hot, really. Then I grew "early jalapeno" and it was terrible, small puny things. And not many, not hot. I was decided an F1 would be the thing and bought Jalafuego seed and haven't grown anything since.

So cowboy candy, I could not imagine eating that with Jalafuegos. But if most jalapenos aren't as hot, I can maybe see eating some made with such fodder. But is cowboy a thing from 100 years back? Or is it relatively new and only being made after the ruination of the jalapeno? And therefore, typically not as hot as I thought it would be, judging by jalafuego F1 heat?

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worth1
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#9

Post: # 125247Unread post worth1
Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:42 am

JRinPA wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:33 am So...cowboy candy.
When I first read about it, I could not imagine why anyone would want to eat that. But...I never ate jalapenos much before growing them myself. We got the Vlasic ones in a huge jar for cheap for quesadillas, that was it. I'd get them on italian hoagies, yeah, not that hot, really. Then I grew "early jalapeno" and it was terrible, small puny things. And not many, not hot. I was decided an F1 would be the thing and bought Jalafuego seed and haven't grown anything since.

So cowboy candy, I could not imagine eating that with Jalafuegos. But if most jalapenos aren't as hot, I can maybe see eating some made with such fodder. But is cowboy a thing from 100 years back? Or is it relatively new and only being made after the ruination of the jalapeno? And therefore, typically not as hot as I thought it would be, judging by jalafuego F1 heat?
It's been around for a coons age.y wife's grandmother made it with screaming hot jalapenos she grew in the garden.
The lady lost her sense of smell in a car wreck and she liked hot peppers.
I've also noticed comments on paste posts on forums about jalapenos that were misleading or wrong.
We made jalapeno jelly many years ago.
I made jalapeno jelly and gave some to my neighbor.
It said it cooked his mouth but couldn't stop eating it.
He actually came over to brag about the stuff with the empty jar I didn't have to ask him.
I think hot and sweet has been around in one fashion or another for a very long time.
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DriftlessRoots
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#10

Post: # 125249Unread post DriftlessRoots
Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:46 am

I put some serranos in my CC to make sure it has at least some heat
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worth1
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#11

Post: # 125252Unread post worth1
Sun Jun 09, 2024 9:03 am

DriftlessRoots wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:46 am I put some serranos in my CC to make sure it has at least some heat
Chili con carne?
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karstopography
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#12

Post: # 125259Unread post karstopography
Sun Jun 09, 2024 9:25 am

worth1 wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 9:03 am
DriftlessRoots wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:46 am I put some serranos in my CC to make sure it has at least some heat
Chili con carne?
I think the CC was about cowboy candy.
Zone 9b, located in the Columbia bottomlands, annual rainfall 46”

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worth1
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Re: How they ruined the jalapeno.

#13

Post: # 125262Unread post worth1
Sun Jun 09, 2024 9:52 am

karstopography wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 9:25 am
worth1 wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 9:03 am
DriftlessRoots wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 8:46 am I put some serranos in my CC to make sure it has at least some heat
Chili con carne?
I think the CC was about cowboy candy.
Well that makes sense. :lol:
Worth
25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.

You can't argue with a closed mind.
You might as well be arguing with a cat.

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