Your most productive bush edamame

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Ginger2778
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Your most productive bush edamame

#1

Post: # 695Unread post Ginger2778
Fri Dec 13, 2019 2:54 pm

We are currently planting,out our demo garden at UF, time is now for our edamame. Please can you recommend the ones you like best for taste and especially production?
- Marsha

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Growing Coastal
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#2

Post: # 700Unread post Growing Coastal
Fri Dec 13, 2019 3:05 pm

So glad you asked this question. A friend and I were talking about growing these just yesterday after having found two varieties in seed catalogs. Midori Giant and Tohya. Of course, the catalogs say that they are very productive. Neither of us have grown them before and I was not finding much online about it so any advice about growing these soy beans would be appreciated.
Has anyone reading grown either of these?
Do they need heat to do well?
Do they need support?
Do rodents find them tasty? Broad beans are left alone here.

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Ginger2778
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#3

Post: # 803Unread post Ginger2778
Fri Dec 13, 2019 9:46 pm

I saw Tohya on Johnny's, all the bulk ones are sold out, so, I think it's popular amongst commercial farmers. That tells me something.
- Marsha

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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#4

Post: # 817Unread post Gardadore
Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:36 pm

Marsha, it is hard to give good advice to someone in Florida since your climate may provide a very different outcome to mine but check this list and my comments. There are many varieties so I would go to a reliable southern seed vendor as well to see what they are offering which might do even better in your climate. Here is my list:

Soybean Aoyu for 2020
Soybean Beer Friend
Soybean Envy
Soybean Giant Midori for 2019
Soybean Green Butterbean
Soybean Hidatsa for 2020
Soybean Sayamusume
Soybean Shirofumi (N)
Soybean Sumo Soy
Soybean Tankuro unusual because are black seeded and delicious. Can be found at Fedco.com.

I have grown all on this list except Aoyu and Hidatsa from Victory Seeds. Don't know Tohya. So far my favorites are Giant Midori, Envy and Tankuro. All are very productive. The S ones are are all good too. Fedco has some of those. Green Butterbean did not germinate well for me so should be tried again with a better pack of seeds.

We love edamame and they are so easy to grow as long as you don't have groundhogs - learned the hard way it is absolutely their most favorite food so must grow in covered cages here! Concerning warm weather: I start them inside because in our climate the ground can be very damp and too cold for good germination in the spring. If I transplant them out I do so much better. I usually plant out end of May or beginning of June (Succession planting is recommended) and harvest end of August or in early September here in PA. I don't really stake unless a particular plant gets overly tall but usually not necessary.

Let us know which varieties you do decide to grow and how it works out!

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Ginger2778
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#5

Post: # 1065Unread post Ginger2778
Sun Dec 15, 2019 7:00 am

Wow, Gardadore, thank you, some excellent info here. I'm going to see what fedco has, based on this info. I appreciate your detailed post.
- Marsha

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Tormato
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#6

Post: # 1403Unread post Tormato
Mon Dec 16, 2019 2:55 pm

I've trailed many, with the weather making it hit or miss on production. Also, soy are critter magnets. Chiba Green has done the best for me. Tankuro has been the best black one. I trialed Black Chestnut this year. I only had 1 plant, a rabbit completely defoliated it, I caged it, it grew back, and I got a few pods. It's an extremely late variety, without the defoliation. I have a very few seeds to spare. ;)

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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#7

Post: # 1447Unread post Ginger2778
Mon Dec 16, 2019 4:35 pm

Tormato wrote: Mon Dec 16, 2019 2:55 pm I've trailed many, with the weather making it hit or miss on production. Also, soy are critter magnets. Chiba Green has done the best for me. Tankuro has been the best black one. I trialed Black Chestnut this year. I only had 1 plant, a rabbit completely defoliated it, I caged it, it grew back, and I got a few pods. It's an extremely late variety, without the defoliation. I have a very few seeds to spare. ;)
I planted some chiba green. It was last Friday. Do they take a while to germinate?
- Marsha

MsCowpea
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#8

Post: # 1483Unread post MsCowpea
Mon Dec 16, 2019 6:01 pm

Hi Marsha,
I planted a variety of soybeans one year. They all did crummy and I even used an inoculate. Couldn’t figure it out as other beans do fantastic.
A Chinese professor/ researcher at the Palm Beach extension told me they did not like alkaline soil. (I looked soybeans up and they do not like highly acid soil either so they do have a sweet spot like most plants). But at times my soil can be highly alkaline (Over 8) and my well water has a high pH as well so maybe they were just miserable. You can correct for the high pH if the plants look deficient with micro nutrients but I never could get a handle on them. I thought about mixing in a bag of peat where they would grow next time but my soil tests aren’t always so out of whack. If your soil test is ‘normal’ maybe you are good to go.
I would like to try again-I love edamame. Good luck. Elaine
"When we kill off the natural enemies of a pest we inherit their work."
Carl Huffaker

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Ginger2778
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#9

Post: # 1491Unread post Ginger2778
Mon Dec 16, 2019 6:17 pm

MsCowpea wrote: Mon Dec 16, 2019 6:01 pm Hi Marsha,
I planted a variety of soybeans one year. They all did crummy and I even used an inoculate. Couldn’t figure it out as other beans do fantastic.
A Chinese professor/ researcher at the Palm Beach extension told me they did not like alkaline soil. (I looked soybeans up and they do not like highly acid soil either so they do have a sweet spot like most plants). But at times my soil can be highly alkaline (Over 8) and my well water has a high pH as well so maybe they were just miserable. You can correct for the high pH if the plants look deficient with micro nutrients but I never could get a handle on them. I thought about mixing in a bag of peat where they would grow next time but my soil tests aren’t always so out of whack. If your soil test is ‘normal’ maybe you are good to go.
I would like to try again-I love edamame. Good luck. Elaine
Thanks Elaine, that's a great tip. What pH meter do you have? I dont trust mine anymore, its been reading 7 all the time. Peat should help bring it down, and we amended the soil with peat before sowing the chiba green. It's at the UF/IFAS demonstration garden. We didn't put innoculant though.
- Marsha

MsCowpea
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#10

Post: # 1682Unread post MsCowpea
Tue Dec 17, 2019 11:10 am

I rely mainly on professional soil tests - I used to do them frequently. A few weeks ago I dusted off my poor mistreated meter
And ‘fixed’ it up but I have yet to use. I will try it out today. I have an ExStik pH 110 which is probably overkill but you can refill this one with electro solution. It is expensive but i think at the time I wanted to do a little hydroponics. The thing is I knew nothing about meters . They require ‘maintenance’ which is easy if you use it frequently. By maintenance you are not supposed to store for long extended times without keeping the bit that does the testing moist with a little sponge in the cap. I let mine go bone dry months and months over the years. It is turning on fine and I recalibrated it And refilled the electrode but don’t know if I ruined it or not. So I read up on it, and they said to rehydrate with 4 ph solution for 10 minutes. With this model you can replace the electrode but they are very expensive as well.

There are cheaper models from this company.
Here is how you use it for soil.


Marsha, I know this is something you already know and you probably want the meter for convenience but for anybody else who reads this you can get really cheap results from your state university. And more detailed analysis with a diagnostic soil lab.
( Use your own state’s agricultural Lab as they know what you need.)

Here is univ of Fl. 3 bucks for pH and $7 for pH, P,K,cal.,mg

http://soilslab.ifas.ufl.edu/ESTL_pages ... etable.htm
"When we kill off the natural enemies of a pest we inherit their work."
Carl Huffaker

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Tormato
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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#11

Post: # 1967Unread post Tormato
Wed Dec 18, 2019 3:17 pm

I wouldn't know about a sweet spot, as my soil likely has a pH around 5.5, or so. From what I've read and experienced, soy likes warm days and cool nights for seed production.

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Re: Your most productive bush edamame

#12

Post: # 58352Unread post zeedman
Mon Nov 29, 2021 11:28 pm

Nearly all of the edamame soybean varieties sold commercially are adapted for the North. Those in the warmer Southern climates might have better results with longer-season soybeans that are better adapted to those climates.

Dr. Bernard of the University of Illinois bred a "Gardensoy" line of superior edamame soybeans, with a wide range of maturities. In the early 2000's, he would send seed to gardeners free upon request; I asked for Gardensoy 12 and Gardensoy 24, both of which I still grow. The first digit in the number refers to the USDA soybean Maturity Group, so mine are Maturity group I & II, both adapted for mid-Wisconsin & points south. Dr. Bernard also bred some varieties in higher Maturity Groups (IV & V), that are well adapted for the mid-U.S. and further South. As far as I know, the U of Illinois is no longer sending out free soybeans. However, I would recommend that anyone in those areas inquire through their local Extension office to see if those Gardensoy varieties, or other soybeans bred specifically for the South, might be available.

Those in sub-tropical climates (the U.S. Gulf coast, parts of California & the Southwest) may have good results with the Hawaiian variety Kohala.
"But though an old man, I am but a young gardener.“ - Thomas Jefferson

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