Spanish Musica

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karstopography
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Spanish Musica

#1

Post: # 59669Unread post karstopography
Fri Dec 24, 2021 5:31 pm

Anyone grown this pole bean? Romano type. Just wondering what the characteristics are? Supposed to be early. Heat or cold tolerance? Flavor? I have a pack, going to grow a few.I’m looking to set expectations.
Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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Tormato
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Re: Spanish Musica

#2

Post: # 59678Unread post Tormato
Fri Dec 24, 2021 7:50 pm

karstopography wrote: Fri Dec 24, 2021 5:31 pm Anyone grown this pole bean? Romano type. Just wondering what the characteristics are? Supposed to be early. Heat or cold tolerance? Flavor? I have a pack, going to grow a few.I’m looking to set expectations.
It's white seeded, so your soil needs to be warmer for germination than with colored seeds.

It's fairly early, a bit over 60 days. It's not the earliest pole bean, as Kwintus/Early Riser/Northeaster come in at 55 days, roughly a week earlier. Those three may, or may not, all be the same bean.

Just average for heat tolerance, but not up there with Rattlesnake. I take my time when planting time comes for pole beans, so I have no experience with cold tolerance.

Like nearly all pole green romano (wide, flat podded) beans, the flavor is really really good. And, like nearly all romano type beans, I rate it below Super Marconi, the best of the best in my garden. Sadly, I've found Super Marconi to have very low heat tolerance.

If you've never had fresh out of the garden green romano beans, I really can't help in describing the flavor. They do not taste like round podded beans.

Like pink beefsteak tomatoes, green pole romano beans, to me, can't be beat. It would be difficult to find a variety that doesn't have great flavor.

Once pods reach full length, and seeds are just starting to swell, the pods should be constantly "picked" (I cut them off with scissors) to keep the vines productive. I usually set aside seed producing vines in a different area of the garden. These vines die much quicker because pods are not picked until dry.

zendog
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Re: Spanish Musica

#3

Post: # 59680Unread post zendog
Fri Dec 24, 2021 8:13 pm

I tried them one year, since I loved Northeaster when my mother grew them in NW Connecticut when I was young, but it never grew well for me here in VA. I was hoping Musica would do better and be a romano type that worked for me. It did a little better, but not great and when it got hot (which happens early here) the pods usually had poor pollination so that only a few beans grew per pod making them not fill out uniformly. I have the same trouble with Blauhilde here, which is sort of a purple podded romano type. For reference, my best beans here so far have been Rattlesnake and Cherokee Trail of Tears.

Let us know if yours do okay in the heat and maybe I'll give them another trial.

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karstopography
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Re: Spanish Musica

#4

Post: # 59691Unread post karstopography
Sat Dec 25, 2021 12:45 am

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I grew Tamara Pole Bean last season. It is a green romano type. I had it right next to Emerite, a french filet pole bean. As I remember it, Emerite hung in there a little longer than Tamara, but Tamara did well. I might do Tamara again. Timing overall seemed to be more or less in line with Emerite, just maybe Tamara quit a little earlier.

In the bags are Tamara on the right and the French Filet ones on the left. Carminat is the purple one. It did the worse, still produced, but petered out earlier than any of them. It was in a different bed from the others. Carminat isn’t coming back this year. I’m planting Rolande and Emerite again. Rolande is a green french filet bush type, but it just seemed to not want to quit producing. I was surprised by how productive it was.

My mom and dad both love the french filet types (they couldn’t tell the difference between the filet types). Mom blanched and froze a goodly amount of those (still eating them here in December). I’m obligated in the spirit and substance of good relations with thy neighbor (my folks and I are neighbors) and by Holy Commandment of Faith (honor thy Father and Mother) to grow the French Filet Rolande and Emerite once again this upcoming season.

We kept the Tamara for ourselves.
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Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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karstopography
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Re: Spanish Musica

#5

Post: # 59699Unread post karstopography
Sat Dec 25, 2021 4:23 am

I’ve got my bean line up set for 2022. Seeds ordered or already in my possession.
Romano pole types:
Algarve - 52 days
Northeaster -56 days
Spanish Musica - 62 days

French Filet pole bean - Emerite - 64 days
French filet bush beans - Rolande- 53 days
Maxibel - 60 days.

Since green beans evidently freeze well, at least the french filets do, I don’t mind it if I get too many at once. Everyone in the family likes green beans, in general they grow well enough here in my garden, might as well grow things that people like and performs well. Beans haven’t been pesty bug magnets or disease prone unlike some other crops and they don’t seem to be too touchy about fertility.
Zone 9a/b, right on the line, in the heart of the Columbia bottomlands. Heat zone 9, Sunset Zone 28, annual rainfall 52”

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Tormato
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Re: Spanish Musica

#6

Post: # 59720Unread post Tormato
Sat Dec 25, 2021 10:49 am

I've found that some of the romano types don't freeze well. They can get a bit mushy. But, I'm starting with extremely tender pods to begin with, Jeminez and some crosses from it. And, if I could grow only one bean, it would be Jeminez. It by far outproduces everything in my garden, unless high heat shuts it down.

Perhaps other varieties, that are less tender would freeze OK. I don't mind the mushy ones added to vegetable and beef soup/stews.

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habitat-gardener
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Location: central california, Sunset zone 14

Re: Spanish Musica

#7

Post: # 59734Unread post habitat-gardener
Sat Dec 25, 2021 3:48 pm

I read in a catalog that Blue Coco is supposed to be heat-tolerant. It was my favorite pole bean when I lived in a milder climate. I'm eager to try it in this hot hot summer climate!

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