Vining Summer Squashes

User avatar
imp
Account Closed
Reactions:
Posts: 262
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:31 am
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas

Vining Summer Squashes

#1

Post: # 546Unread post imp
Fri Dec 13, 2019 1:47 am

Though I am most fond of many of the bush types, the only vining summer squash I have found so far is Lemon, and would like to find more of them. It's easier to fight the darned squash bugs if the squash vines are trellised, plus it saves space, too.

Anyone knowing of any varieties that vine or sources, please do post.
Together, trees make an ecosystem that tempers the extremes of heat & cold, stores lots of water, & makes a lot of humidity. In this environment, trees can live to be very old. To get to this point, the community must remain intact no matter what.

User avatar
Shule
Reactions:
Posts: 2488
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#2

Post: # 1037Unread post Shule
Sat Dec 14, 2019 10:23 pm

Yes. A few include Tatume, Zucchino Rampicante, and I believe Zucchetta Trombocino. Some of the scallop squashes might be vining types.

Although they're not squash, I also recommend Kikinda Competition Strain edible gourds.
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

User avatar
Shule
Reactions:
Posts: 2488
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#3

Post: # 1038Unread post Shule
Sat Dec 14, 2019 10:26 pm

There's also Cucurbita ficifolia, although I prefer it as a winter squash. It tastes great as a summer squash, but the juice or something sticks to your teeth.
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

User avatar
imp
Account Closed
Reactions:
Posts: 262
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:31 am
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#4

Post: # 1240Unread post imp
Mon Dec 16, 2019 5:49 am

Thanks, shule, but the one you mention is primarily grown for it's seeds I think. I'm trying to locate a summer squash type; seem to recall both yellow crooknecks and zucchini's having running vines in the 1960's.
Together, trees make an ecosystem that tempers the extremes of heat & cold, stores lots of water, & makes a lot of humidity. In this environment, trees can live to be very old. To get to this point, the community must remain intact no matter what.

User avatar
Shule
Reactions:
Posts: 2488
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#5

Post: # 1600Unread post Shule
Tue Dec 17, 2019 2:24 am

C. ficifolia does have great seeds, but they still have hulls. They're just black. The fruits have a lot of uses. As a winter squash they keep a super long time. They can be used as a replacement for shark fins in shark fin soup. The flesh of mature fruits is like rice noodles. People do use it as a summer squash, though (when young it's much like zucchini, but much more tasty in a tropical sort of way with a nice texture; the sticky stuff is the only issue there, but if you cook it, I imagine that goes away).

Zucchino Rampicante is a zucchini (granted, it's a C. moschata zucchini, the color of a Butternut squash; not as early as C. pepo zucchini).

That would be great to find vining C. pepo zucchini. I've had an F1 cross with Dark Star zucchini that was semi-vining, but they weren't as desirable as the parent (not as productive, but they tasted pretty great and sweet; they were shorter and fatter, though, and people thought they were cute). I'm not sure what the father plant was.
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

BettyC-5
Reactions:
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:24 pm
Location: Idaho panhandle

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#6

Post: # 2042Unread post BettyC-5
Wed Dec 18, 2019 6:25 pm

I grew these once, would do better in longer growing season.
Tromboncino- Mo, 70 days, The light green-to-tan fruit can grow up to 3 feet long and may be harvested anytime, from just a few inches through its full size. Enjoy Tromboncino's rich flavor steamed, grilled, or sliced raw in your favorite salad. A vining variety that is best trellised for straighter fruit.
:)

User avatar
Nan6b
Reactions:
Posts: 1545
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:58 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#7

Post: # 2069Unread post Nan6b
Wed Dec 18, 2019 8:01 pm

~ It seems to me that, until about 10 years ago, all zucchini were vining, and the bush ones are only lately around. In 2016, I grew a vining zucc.

User avatar
Shule
Reactions:
Posts: 2488
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#8

Post: # 2106Unread post Shule
Thu Dec 19, 2019 12:32 am

Nan6b wrote: Wed Dec 18, 2019 8:01 pm ~ It seems to me that, until about 10 years ago, all zucchini were vining, and the bush ones are only lately around. In 2016, I grew a vining zucc.
We grew zucchini when I was a kid, and all the ones I can remember were bush types. We probably grew Black Beauty and striped kinds. Black Beauty was a 1957 AAS winner. It's quite possible that they sold the vining types longer in your area than mine, though! I'd love to see a vining standard green zucchini. Huge zucchini remind me of Komodo dragons. I can just imagine them lying all over the garden on a vine.
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

User avatar
Shule
Reactions:
Posts: 2488
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#9

Post: # 2108Unread post Shule
Thu Dec 19, 2019 12:35 am

Ooh! If you're not partial to them actually being squash, you should try the Metki Dark Green Serpent melon. It's an Armenian cucumber, but they look a lot like zucchini, and grow fast, early, and prolific like them, too. They have a vining habit. Well, I started mine early and transplanted them out (I'm not sure if they'd be early direct-seeded).
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

User avatar
Nan6b
Reactions:
Posts: 1545
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:58 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#10

Post: # 2185Unread post Nan6b
Thu Dec 19, 2019 11:35 am

A quick search shows Sandhillpreservation.com has the following vining squashes.

Mandan- 47 days- Small, round, flattened Native American type. Small vines are heavy producers of these cream colored with green or yellow striped fruits. Average quality, but great insect tolerance. Very variable in fruit type.This one came to us with multiple variants and we are still selecting for the proper color pattern to occur in all fruits. Pkt. $2.00 Certified Organic Seed
Table Dainty- 65 days- Vining, blocky green/yellow striped. About 6 inches long. Very productive. Developed in 1909. Pkt. $2.50 Certified Organic Seed
Tatume- 65 days - Vining, heat tolerant and high insect tolerant. Round, pumpkin shaped summer squash. Fruits are a pale grey green. Pkt. $2.00
Trailing Green Marrow- 70 days- Late for a summer squash, but excellent for a season finisher and continues for the remainder of the season. Very vigorous vines produce numerous fruits that are striped and remain edible when they become quite large. Pkt. $2.00 Certified Organic Seed

User avatar
pepperhead212
Reactions:
Posts: 2229
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:07 am
Location: Woodbury, NJ

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#11

Post: # 7474Unread post pepperhead212
Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:25 pm

@imp I found something a few years ago that I use in place of summer squash - bottle gourds. I simply can't grow non-moschata squash here, due to SVBs - I'm lucky to get one or two squash, before the plants are gone. I tried some of the vining varieties, as well as chayote, but gave up on it, and I didn't like that Italian vining zucchini - a moschata species, but the fruits got sappy.

The bottle gourds are a different genus ( Lageneria siceraria) and are not susceptible to SVB. The fruits are sort of like a summer squash - not a whole lot of flavor, and full of water (1 lb reduces to 1 oz, dehydrated), but they don't get mushy, even after 15 minutes cooking! And not seedy, until quite large. The plants are very productive, and very viney! It seems like at the base of every leaf, there's a sucker! One drawback: it flowers at night. Early in the season t
(They start flowering in 45-50 days) I had to hand pollinate them, but later on, night-time insects came around. And when I grew only the long variety, a bunch of female flowers came out, and there were no males to pollinate them! Opposite of winter squash I grow. When both were grown, I guess it was the small one that had male flowers early, I just didn't notice.

Here's a photo of some long gourds and a short one (Dhol):
ImageDSCF0794 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Here's a photo of a 14" long gourd sliced in half, showing how the seeds are barely beginning to form. Summer squash get seeds faster at 6"!
ImageDSCF0774 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

And here's a long one, on a vine. Those are tomatoes behind, because the vine went about 12' down the trellis, to where they were!
ImageDSCF0771 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

I have used these in place of zucchini in many recipes, as well as in traditional Indian recipes. And they were firm enough to spiralize, and made great veggie noodles!
ImageDSCF0801 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

And here's something I almost forgot about - all those tendrils! Not something often seen in cookbooks, but they are often added to Asian stir-fries and soups, along with those suckers. And these plants have a lot of them!
ImageDSCF0749 by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Last edited by pepperhead212 on Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Woodbury, NJ zone 6B-7

User avatar
Tormato
Reactions:
Posts: 2874
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:14 pm

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#12

Post: # 7496Unread post Tormato
Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:46 pm

Tenting aluminum foil over the base of squash plants has worked extremely well, for me, in warding off SVBs.

User avatar
GoDawgs
Reactions:
Posts: 2603
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 6:38 am
Location: Zone 8a, Augusta GA

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#13

Post: # 7497Unread post GoDawgs
Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:46 pm

The spaghetti squash is a pepo and the one that works well for me is 'Small Wonder'. One is just enough for two people. I like the strands with garlic butter and parm. Spaghetti sauce is also an option. Last year (bite my tongue) there was very little SVB action until mid summer. In general, they aren't bothered too much and I wonder why.

Unripe squash on vines:

Image

Later in the season with squash about ready:

Image

This is pretty representative of the size:

Image

I don't know what I was thinking last spring when I planted two of them. We got about 28 of those things and were giving them away! One will be a gracious plenty this year. ;)

User avatar
Gthegardener
Reactions:
Posts: 72
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2020 5:37 pm
Location: Massachusetts, zone 6b

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#14

Post: # 7506Unread post Gthegardener
Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:21 pm

As far as vining squashes I've had good luck with 1. honeynut squash (it's like a personal sized butternut squash but tastier) 2. Honey boat delicata (gold and cream striped delicata - also a personal sized squash). I do keep all my squash vines covered with floating row cover until after the 4th of july to save them from vine bores.
“Life begins the day you start a garden” - Chinese proverb

User avatar
Shule
Reactions:
Posts: 2488
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2019 3:29 pm
Location: SW Idaho, USA

Bottle gourds

#15

Post: # 7510Unread post Shule
Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:12 pm

pepperhead212 wrote: Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:25 pm
The bottle gourds are a different genus ( Lageneria siceraria) and are not susceptible to SVB. The fruits are sort of like a summer squash - not a whole lot of flavor, and full of water (1 lb reduces to 1 oz, dehydrated), but they don't get mushy, even after 15 minutes cooking! …
I can vouch for that. You can cook them pretty much as long or as hot as you want, and they still have good texture. My experience is mostly with baking, but I've fried them, too.
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
Elevation: 2,260 feet

User avatar
imp
Account Closed
Reactions:
Posts: 262
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:31 am
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#16

Post: # 7536Unread post imp
Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:43 am

Thanks for all the tips and suggestions.

I'm wanting to make an order from Glenn and his lovely wife ( SandHill) so will remember the green marrow, thanks Nan. The information on the gourds sounds interesting as sometimes summer squashes just dissolve in soups and stews, plus the tip about the tips and what looked like the early leaves looked yummy! I like a plant I can get more than 1 sort of use from, more bang for the buck! Any variety suggestions, pepperhead? I know very little about gourds, especially the edible ones.

GoDaws, thank you for those pictures, I had been curious about that one and held off buying that seed afraid they would gget too big. Those look like a suitable size for a 1 to 2 person one! And I do like productive winter squash. So lovely to have in winter when there is not any active garden.
Together, trees make an ecosystem that tempers the extremes of heat & cold, stores lots of water, & makes a lot of humidity. In this environment, trees can live to be very old. To get to this point, the community must remain intact no matter what.

zendog
Reactions:
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:40 pm
Location: Arlington, VA - zone 7A

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#17

Post: # 7558Unread post zendog
Fri Jan 24, 2020 12:32 pm

Just to give you even more choices, I'll suggest you check out Korean Summer Squash which are vining. I've been growing Tatume and like them a lot but someone on another forum suggested I give these a try as well. They sell seed for them at Kitizama:
https://www.kitazawaseed.com/seeds_summer_squash.html

They are also in the Moschata family, so they should handle the squash borers well, and while they vine they aren't as big/long as some like the tromboncino. I just can't decide between Meot Jaeng I Ae (called the sweetest) that looks more like traditional zukes and the Early Bulam one that gets great reviews and is one of the ones they sometimes call avocado squash. I like avocado and I like squash... so maybe I'll try both!

By the way, I just had some bottle gourd in a stir fry I made last night and it was pretty good as well. How many acres is your garden, lol?

User avatar
MrBig46
Reactions:
Posts: 313
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 12:29 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#18

Post: # 7564Unread post MrBig46
Fri Jan 24, 2020 1:55 pm

pepperhead212 wrote: Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:25 pm @imp I found something a few years ago that I use in place of summer squash - bottle gourds. I simply can't grow non-moschata squash here, due to SVBs - I'm lucky to get one or two squash, before the plants are gone. I tried some of the vining varieties, as well as chayote, but gave up on it, and I didn't like that Italian vining zucchini - a moschata species, but the fruits got sappy.

The bottle gourds are a different genus ( Lageneria siceraria) and are not susceptible to SVB. The fruits are sort of like a summer squash - not a whole lot of flavor, and full of water (1 lb reduces to 1 oz, dehydrated), but they don't get mushy, even after 15 minutes cooking! And not seedy, until quite large. The plants are very productive, and very viney! It seems like at the base of every leaf, there's a sucker! One drawback: it flowers at night. Early in the season t
(They start flowering in 45-50 days) I had to hand pollinate them, but later on, night-time insects came around. And when I grew only the long variety, a bunch of female flowers came out, and there were no males to pollinate them! Opposite of winter squash I grow. When both were grown, I guess it was the small one that had male flowers early, I just didn't notice.

Here's a photo of some long gourds and a short one (Dhol):
ImageDSCF0794 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Here's a photo of a 14" long gourd sliced in half, showing how the seeds are barely beginning to form. Summer squash get seeds faster at 6"!
ImageDSCF0774 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

And here's a long one, on a vine. Those are tomatoes behind, because the vine went about 12' down the trellis, to where they were!
ImageDSCF0771 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

I have used these in place of zucchini in many recipes, as well as in traditional Indian recipes. And they were firm enough to spiralize, and made great veggie noodles!
ImageDSCF0801 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

And here's something I almost forgot about - all those tendrils! Not something often seen in cookbooks, but they are often added to Asian stir-fries and soups, along with those suckers. And these plants have a lot of them!
ImageDSCF0749 by pepperhead212, on Flickr
What a taste Lagenaria iceraria has? Does it taste like zucchini? Isn't it too sweet?
Vlado

User avatar
imp
Account Closed
Reactions:
Posts: 262
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:31 am
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#19

Post: # 7570Unread post imp
Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:42 pm

How many acres? I am urban, right smack dab in the city. A small front and back yard and the devil's strip between the sidewalk and the road/curb. BUT, I have a way to trellis even long vines as I have a 2 story house and a large front porch, plus the house sits up about 3 plus feet off the ground.
Together, trees make an ecosystem that tempers the extremes of heat & cold, stores lots of water, & makes a lot of humidity. In this environment, trees can live to be very old. To get to this point, the community must remain intact no matter what.

zendog
Reactions:
Posts: 263
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:40 pm
Location: Arlington, VA - zone 7A

Re: Vining Summer Squashes

#20

Post: # 7571Unread post zendog
Fri Jan 24, 2020 3:18 pm

Sounds like just enough space to try one of everything in this thread!

Post Reply

Return to “Squash”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests